SAM’s gift shop is overflowing with original art, prints, photography, crafts, unique greeting cards, and books!

Several new artists have recently brought in some very interesting items: Nancy Van Susteren lives in Mt. Shasta, and creates traditional Japanese hand-dyed silk scarves. Patrick Mulondo, from Uganda, Africa has brought in some recycled, polished cow bone jewelry and cups.

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Shasta Shibori Scarves

Shasta Shibori Scarves

Nancy Van Susteren / ARTIST’S STATEMENT:
“Working with fabric has always been my passion, I enjoy making functional items for gifts. Living beneath Mount Shasta, watching the colors and moods change each day, has always been an inspiration to me. I love the stark contrast between the pure white of the mountain and the deep blue of the sky on a clear winter day. That color contrast is what first attracted me to Shibori.”

Shibori is an ancient Japanese dye process where fabric pieces are manipulated by folding, stitching, clamping, wrapping and twisting; turning two-dimensional fabric into three-dimensional objects. The objects are then dipped into an indigo dye vat. When removed, they are a lime green color; as the dye oxidizes, they turn indigo blue. The oxidation process fixes the dye to the fabric. Repeated rounds of dipping and oxidation make a deeper, darker blue. Only the portion exposed to the air will turn blue, the rest remains white. This process is what makes the geometric and amorphous patterns that you see on the scarves.

 

Little Bangles of polished cow horn

Little Bangles of polished cow horn

Patrick Mulondo / ARTIST’S STATEMENT:
“The challenge of creating an unequalled piece of art from flung metal parts, with the aim of recycling, is the task ahead in my career. I want to give new life to the already-flung household and industrial scrap that I find.”

Patrick’s sculptures explore the current trend of up-cycling, using metal scrap together with cast fiberglass to give old, found objects an entirely new and extraordinary life. He also works with recycled cow horns and brass to create jewelry and other small works of art.

Fashionable wrist cuff of polished cow horn

Fashionable wrist cuff of polished cow horn

Born in 1989, Ugandan artist Patrick Mulondo’s sculptures explore the current trend of up-cycling, using metal scrap together with cast fibre glass to give old, found objects an entirely new and extraordinary life. Two years ago, some of his major metal scrap sculptures were shown in Siskiyou County at the Marble Rim Gallery in Fort Jones and here at the Siskiyou Arts Museum.